Schools take issue with new state accountability system

The state of Texas rolled out a new A-F grading system this year to assess individual schools and districts based on standardized testing results. The complex system of sub-population indicators, categories, and other data gathered on a state level is reduced to a simple letter grade. Educators argue that when presented to the public as a stand alone assessment, is not an accurate representation of student or school success.

Edge of teen angst: Movie captures adolescent attitudes through comedy, drama

We live in an era where a majority of young adults think that the world owes them something. Teens have used methods of expressing themselves over time from passing notes in class, to Myspace, to Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr, but teen angst remains mostly the same as time passes. The new teen dramedy film, The Edge of Seventeen, is a funny, quirky, and perceptive look at Nadine Franklin’s (Hailee Steinfeld) life during her junior year of high school. The Edge of Seventeen is one the funniest coming-of-age teen dramedy films I have seen in a long time.

All the world’s a stage: Theatre program performs play, playwright attends

The lights blind senior Caleb Duane as he takes the stage. He feels the familiar rush of adrenaline as a hush falls over the audience. Caleb is used to performing to both crowds large and small, but this time it’s different. This time he is performing for the shows creator. This time he portrays a character with the writer, who originally brought this true story to stage, sitting in the audience.

Patchwork pride: Principals mother constructs quilt to capture Viking spirit

What it means to be a Viking can’t be summed up with a single word or item, but instead is made up of many parts to create the whole. Each activity, club, sport, and individual student comes together to make Bryan High a unique place where students are at the center. The idea that the sum is greater than the parts can be seen in the quilt principal Lane Buban’s mother Sharon Buban created for the school. The quilt is made of t-shirts from various groups around the school and will be hung in the Silver Cafeteria area as a reminder of the collective spirit of the Vikings.

After the fire: Community leaders help educate seniors by hosting guest speakers

“Do we really have to go outside? Can’t we just close the door and wait in the classroom?” students ask teachers as the alarm sounds signaling a fire drill. The lack of concern and idea that nothing bad could happen to them was the mentality Shawn Simons and Alvaro Llanos aimed to change by sharing their story.

Summer construction projects lay foundation for future

Students returned to campus this year noticing several big changes including a secure single entrance to campus, a new dining area, and a new press box. These construction projects were funded by a bond passed a year and a half ago and have helped Bryan High in regards to both safety and functionality.

Just like you like it: Senior’s parking spot, love of Whataburger gains attention on social media

Texans take pride in their state symbols: the armadillo, the yellow rose, the state flag, bluebonnets, Blue Bell, Dr. Pepper, and of course Whataburger. In a town where orange and white paint usually doesn’t gain a lot of support, senior Ross McGregor used the two colors to create a masterpiece every Texan can support. For the entirety of the 2016-2017 school year, Ross will park in his reserved space at school, marked by the familiar stripes of the Whataburger order tents.

Crossing over: Teacher transitions back to being student for summer

Many of us look to our teachers as mentors, guides, and in many cases, holders of infinite knowledge who we could only one day hope to possess. Often times we forget that teachers were once students, and have shared many of the difficult feats we face every day. For some teachers, school doesn’t end with the final bell after finals, but instead they trade their teaching caps for thinking caps, and take on the role of a student once again.

Divergent series diverges into gutter

Allegiant, yet another novel from Divergent trilogy by Veronica Roth, hit theaters March 18. Fans anticipated the film and hoped it would surpass the disappointment of the last movie. With hopeful hearts, while secretly preparing for the worst, droves of fans attended the premier as they had anticipated the movies release since it was first announced as a series.

Ag program steers student in positive direction

Early mornings in the barn cleaning and feeding. Watching the sun rise over the trees no matter the weather. Taking care of livestock requires commitment and responsibility. Sophomore Wilsey Wendler has found success in showing steers as an activity which has been passed down from generation to generation.

#Goals: Senior earns scholarship to continue playing in college

Training, leading, and determination are some qualities to make a great athlete. By watching her sister play and contributed by playing on her own team, senior Rebecca Adcock has attributed those qualities. Soccer as a physical sport, however it’s also a mental sport. Using the mind to know when to pass the ball, communicate with your teammates and what to do next.

School safety top priority for administration

The administration has taken steps to ensure the safety of students and staff members at Bryan High by being proactive before any serious incidents occur. Gates have been installed to prevent unwanted people from passing through campus and exterior doors have been locked to limit access to the building.

America should be place for hopes & dreams, not fear & prejudice

War is bad. It has been sad that war brings a country together, but it mostly tears it apart. Sure people come together to lift each other up and work toward a common goal, but that’s only after family members have been ravaged by war and countries are suffering economically and safety wise.

Feast summons magical memories through music, food, fun, & family

Feast of Carols returns for its 32nd production this weekend. It’s a magical event put on by the the choir and orchestra students, and transports guests to medieval time. Filling the night with laughter, full stomachs and musical enjoyment.

Christmas wish list: Finding unique, affordable gifts this holiday season

Christmas is a time to celebrate, spend time with family, give and receive presents, and eat all the food we can. However, most people find themselves struggling with one simple thing the presents. I’ve been through it countless times, the holidays come around, stores are booming with sales, and everyone’s eager to receive the best presents in the world, but the ideas are nowhere to be found. It seems that every time I don’t have the money or a reason to buy presents for my loved ones, presents are jumping off the shelves, but when confronted with decisions of what to choose for that oh so special Christmas gift, the ideas are less than ample.

Guns & education: Students work with admin to stay safe on campus, look to future as college campus carry laws change

Weapon. Protection. Gun safety. Gun Control. Word choice can shape an argument and when it comes to people’s opinions on guns the debate only becomes more intense as people make decisions on how to keep students safe on campus and when and where to allow people to carry guns. Schools are given the task of […]

Down, but not out: Senior offensive lineman redefines role on team after injury

Players stare across the line at each other waiting for the ball to be hiked. Beads of sweat run down their faces as the tension builds with each word the quarterback yells. The ball sails from the center’s hands into the quarterback’s and the play begins. Each offensive lineman blocks the man across from him. Pushing, protecting the quarterback and the running back coming around the end. But plays, like life, don’t always go as expected. A defensive players peels off his man and slams into the back of one of the offensive lineman’s knees. Pain. Pain, not yardage is gained on this play.

Backpacks and moonlight: Gaining perspective, experience through summer abroad

Suitcase- check. Backpack – check. Multiple forms of currency – check. Passport… Long story, but check.

This summer I traveled to Europe alone for the first time. Most 16-year-old’s parents would never consider allowing them to travel abroad, much less alone, but my parents and sister were born in Bosnia and much of my family is scattered across Europe. Having family live in a different countries has made it difficult to keep in touch with everyone, so my family and I try to go to Bosnia i Hercegovina as much as we can during summer breaks. We are the only ones in our family who live in America, so it’s easier for us to travel to Europe rather than everyone else coming here. Also, it’s a lot easier for Americans to travel out of the country than my family from Europe to get a visa to come to the US.

All the world’s a stage: Senior finds family, direction through theatre troupe

The curtain rises. The lights shine down on the stage. Senior Katie Svatek walks out and begins to sing as the crowd falls silent. Opening night can shake a performers nerves, but knowing there is a support group backstage can make all the difference both on stage and off.

Second movie in Divergent series disappoints audiences

Insurgent, another novel from the Divergent Trilogy by Veronica Roth, is finally in theatres. Fans have been waiting for a year for this film to hit box office, and it’s finally here.

Freshman athlete demonstrates leadership on varsity team

Working with scissors and construction paper, learning to read independently, forming letters on three lined paper – all these skills, children begin to learn as five year olds. Freshman Angel Quiroga began fostering another, more athletic skills at the tender age of five – playing soccer. Angel has been playing for the past ten years and, just like the other skills students begin to learn in kindergarten, he has made huge strides in his soccer career by playing on several teams before high school.

Stars align in movie adaptation of book sensation

The movie based on an award winning novel, The Fault In Our Stars is about two teens who have different cancer conditions falling in love after meeting at a cancer support group.

Hole in D-1: Senior earns place on UTSA golf team, signs letter of intent

The crowd falls silent as he steps up to the tee. His club slices through the air with a resounding thud as it connects with the ball, sending it sailing down the fairway and onto the green. Senior Dylan Godfrey then makes his way to the ball to secure another par and stay on track to finish among the top competitors.

Sibling Emptinester: Learning to deal with older siblings absence highlights importance of relationship

From fighting to loving, making memories to making each other cry, the love/hate relationship amongst siblings is a powerful thing.

Students enlist in military, gain means to attend college

While some students are struggling to find ways to pay for the climbing cost of college tuition, the military is providing another option. Seniors Kaitlyn Harris and Matthew Greer both received $83,000 checks to be used for college through the American GI bill for committing to the military for at least three years post high school graduation.

Big screen success for book trilogy: Fans await release of second Divergent movie

If you have watched the Hunger Games, and you’re seeking another thrilling young adult movie, Divergent might be the choice for you. Trilogies have become increasingly popular over the last decade, but Divergent is a cut above other series such as Twilight. As the screen faded to black, I just sat there, wondering if I would be able to wait for the second installment.