“Valete!” [Goodbye] To Latin: Course to be removed from Bryan High

Erin Garcia

Fame, coast, school, picture, miracle. What is the common factor for all of these very different words? They’re all derived from Latin – a vital language that is the basis of many other languages. The removal of the Latin program from Bryan High has left many questioning the reason behind the decision.

“The removal of Latin reduces our student’s option of learning a critical foundational language,” Latin lll, lV and IB teacher, Ines Golsan said. “Latin is the root language of Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian. Eighty percent of words in Spanish come from Latin and over 60% of English words are Latin based.”

Some believe the extraction of this course makes Bryan High less of a competitor with other various schools around town and will decrease the administrations ability to give to the needs of certain students.

“Both high schools in College Station, Brazos Christian, and St. Michael’s offer Latin,” Golsan said. “Not all students are successful in studying a modern language, which places equal emphasis on the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.”

Latin has been apart of Bryan High for about 25 years, and gave deaf education students a curriculum to learn and become prosperous in without the hindrance of other foreign languages.

“This is my 22nd year,” Golsan said. “I do know that some hearing impaired students have taken Latin at Bryan High with great success.”

Golsan has enjoyed her experience teaching Latin to the students who are enthusiastic about learning.

“[students are] intrigued by history and mythology, and enjoy growing their word power,” Golsan said. “I have always loved the energy and enthusiasm of high school students. I am having a great year with the six remaining Latin students. I will miss this.”

Viking Senior, Emma Slowey, one of Golsan’s remaining Latin students, highly expresses her appreciation for all she has learned from the program.

“It is the perfect complement to the IB program,” Slowey said. “As I have learned so much classical history throughout the course.”

Students such as Slowey, have become accustomed to the course, having taken it in years before high school. They’re love for the language and teacher, has prospered in the years as well.

“I have taken Latin since the sixth grade and I truly believe that we are blessed with one of the best Latin teachers in the Brazos Valley here at Bryan High, Mrs. Golsan,” Slowey said. “I certainly would not have come to Bryan High if it were not for the fine Latin department.”

Students taking the course have enhanced their word use and expanded their knowledge from the teachings of Latin, and are disappointed to see it be removed.

“I have benefited incredibly from our Latin department, and I think it would be a mistake to remove it from Bryan High curriculum,” Slowey said.