Agriculture student follows in family footsteps

Friday, April 29, 2016 at 4:00 pm

Waking up early in the mornings to feed their animals, putting in hours each day to prepare for the next show, and enjoying every minute of it. That’s the typical life of an agriculture student. Junior Harper Langton’s dedication paid off at Brazos Valley Livestock Contest showing her goats placing second.

“Harper recently ended her year showing goats,” agriculture teacher Joshua Hohertz said. “[She] ended with a bang and placed second in her class at the Brazos County Livestock Show, which is something many competitors strive for.”

Harper took almost a year to raise her goats and plans to raise even more as she sticks to being in ag.

“It took me nine months to raise my goats,” Harper said. “I started in July and I finished in March. I raised two goats and I showed them this year. Next year I plan to raise and show four or five goats.

Showing goats is not just about a single day spent in a arena, but instead requires preparation and consistency with academic classes.

“Participants have to be passing every class and they have to take a course where ethics for animals is discussed,” Harper said. “Participants also have to take care of their animal and then they’re able to show.”

Although many would say that showing goats has its own rewards it is also nice to have hard work recognized with monetary and other prizes. “I won a boot bag and a saleslot where I sold my goat for $1800s,” Harper said.

Agriculture is in Harper’s blood as she is part of a family that has grown up around raising and showing livestock.

“My brother did it, my dad did it, and that was part of the influence,” Harper said. “I chose to do goats because we got a new teacher and he showed goats for 14 years and I wanted to branch out to another animal and showing goats has definitely been my happy place.”

Harper’s agriculture teacher sees the potential in her to continue growing based on what she has already been able to accomplish.

“I have had the privilege to not only teach Harper in the ag shop,” Hohertz said. “She’s also been able to push her leadership abilities, competitive nature, and drive to put a good name to Bryan FFA,”

Agriculture will continue to be a part of Harper’s life next year and after graduation as she enjoys the activity as a whole.

“I do plan to continue my career in agriculture as I get older.” Harper said. “I don’t know that I’ll necessarily  pursue a career with goats, but I will pursue it around agriculture.”

Harper’s dedication to ag has not only benefitted her, but the ag program as a whole

“I feel that the greatest honor of working with Harper not only comes from her high placing at county show, but from witnessing her determination to push our chapter to greater things,” Hohertz said.

 

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